The Benefits and Pitfalls of Prenatal Genetic Tests

In a letter to the editor, written in response to a story about false positives in prenatal genetic testing, Susan Klugman, M.D., explains that these tests, like mammography, are for screening, not diagnosis, and that healthcare practitioners with appropriate training must provide genetic counseling to parents prior to testing. Dr. Klugman is professor of pediatrics and of obstetrics & gynecology and women's health at Einstein, and director of reproductive and medical genetics at Montefiore.


In a New York Times letter to the editor, Einstein and Montefiore geneticist Susan Klugman, M.D., explains how next-generation genetic sequencing tests can help guide treatment decisions for those who test BRCA negative but have strong family history of breast and ovarian cancers. Dr. Klugman is associate professor of clinical obstetrics & gynecology and women's health at Einstein, director of reproductive genetics at Montefiore Medical Center and director of clinical services and community outreach for the Program for Jewish Genetic Health at Yeshiva University.


The New York Times published a letter to the editor by Susan Klugman, M.D., explaining the problems with genetic tests for Tay-Sachs disease and the benefits of using enzyme testing to accurately identify carriers. Her letter was in response to Emily Rapp’s essay on raising a son with Tay-Sachs after genetic tests incorrectly showed she was not a carrier of the disease. Dr. Klugman is associate professor of clinical obstetrics & gynecology and women's health at Einstein and director of clinical services and community outreach for the Program for Jewish Genetic Health at Yeshiva University.