Don't Expect the Next COVID Variant to Be Mild, Warn Experts

Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., says there is no biological basis to the idea that the virus that causes COVID-19 will evolve to become less virulent. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology at Einstein.


Neutralizing Antibody Response to Yellow Fever Vaccination Attenuated in South America

Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., and Denise Haslwanter, Ph.D., describe their study that finds the human antibody response induced by the widely used yellow fever vaccine has reduced activity against the recent Brazilian strain of the virus. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology at Einstein. Dr. Haslwanter is a research fellow in Dr. Chandran's lab.


The Omicron Variant is Surging. Here's What We've Learned So Far

Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., says the omicron variant of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 may be both more transmissible and better able to evade the immune response than previous variants, although more data is needed. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology.


Omicron Arrives On the Scene

Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., says there is much to learn about the new COVID-19 variant, omicron, including if it is more likely to cause severe disease or spread more easily that currently dominant variants. He notes the importance of vaccination and getting booster shots to protect against the virus. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Scholar in Virology at Einstein. (Interview begins at 1:22)


Five Reasons Why You Don't Need to Panic About Coronavirus Variants

Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., explains that despite the existence of variants to COVID-19, the virus has not fundamentally changed, and stresses the importance of using the current effective vaccines to control the pandemic. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Scholar in Virology at Einstein.


What's Ahead for SARS-CoV-2 Research in 2021

Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., talks about the future of COVID-19 research, including the development of treatments and vaccines to treat and prevent the novel coronavirus as it mutates over time. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Scholar in Virology at Einstein.


The Coronavirus is Mutating. What Does That Mean for Us?

Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., comments on a highly contagious new variant of the coronavirus, noting the body produces numerous antibodies that will make it difficult for the virus to escape a full immune system response. Dr.Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Scholar in Virology at Einstein.

Additional Coverage includes The Scientist


The Race for a Super-Antibody Against the Coronavirus

Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., describes the efforts of a multi-institutional collaboration he is leading to discover a potent, long-lasting antibody that would be effective against a range of coronaviruses, not only the one that causes COVID-19. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Scholar in Virology at Einstein.


First Ebola Treatment Approved by FDA

Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., comments on the importance of developing antibody treatments for Ebola and other emerging viruses. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Scholar in Virology at Einstein.


A Man in Hong Kong is the First Confirmed Case of Coronavirus Reinfection

Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., discusses the case of a man who was reinfected with COVID-19 after he recovered from an initial bout of the disease. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Scholar in Virology at Einstein.


Blood from COVID-19 Survivors Might Point the Way to a Cure

Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., explains the process of developing monoclonal antibodies, synthetic antibodies that target a specific infection, and the race to create them to treat people with COVID-19. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology.


Antibodies from Ebola survivor could lead to treatments and vaccines

Research led by Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., found human antibodies that are effective against all major disease-causing ebolaviruses. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology.


Newsweek interviews Dr. Kartik Chandran about his Ebola research and discovery of human antibodies that are effective against all major disease-causing ebolaviruses. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology.

More coverage on this story

The Scientist
International Business Times
US News & World Report (via HealthDay)
LiveScience
Voice of America
Seeker


Wall Street Journal interviews Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., and Steven Walkley, D.V.M., Ph.D., about the connection between the rare genetic disease Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) and Ebola. Dr. Chandran’s research suggests that the gene mutation responsible for NPC may offer protection against Ebola. Dr. Walkley notes that it is well-known that carriers of certain genetic diseases might have protection against other diseases, citing that carriers for sickle-cell disease might be protected against malaria. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology and holds the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology. Dr. Walkley is director of the Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center and professor of pathology, of neurology and of neuroscience at Einstein. (subscription only)

More coverage on this story

The Scientist
CBSNews.com


The New York Daily News interviews Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., about the evolving Ebola epidemic and the risk of airline travel in light of news that someone who later tested positive for the virus traveled by air while infected. Dr. Chandran notes that there has never been a case when a person caught Ebola on an airplane. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology and holds the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology.