Academic Honors & Events

Search Academic Honors & Events

Keywords:   

Optical Excellence—The National Eye Institute has awarded Dr. Wei Liu and his team $40,000 for developing two different types of organoids that mimic the human retina in complex features. One of the small retinal structures that Dr. Liu’s group created is rich in cones—visual receptor cells responsible for color vision and visual acuity—and the other contains an optic nerve-like structure. The organoids can serve as models for researchers investigating retinal diseases that threaten or severely impair vision, such as juvenile glaucoma and Leber Congenital Amaurosis. In a video about his research, Dr. Liu explains how to grow the organoids. This is Dr. Liu’s third success in the NEI 3-D Retina Organoid Challenge, making him the only winner who has succeeded three times in a row. Dr. Liu is Assistant Professor of ophthalmology & visual sciences and of genetics.  

Friday, September 03, 2021
 

Award to Tackle Lung Cancer—Cancer immunotherapy is a treatment strategy that “takes the brakes off” immune cells so they can attack cancer cells. These therapies have revolutionized cancer care. But not all patients respond, and scientists don’t fully understand why. Brendon Stiles, M.D., has received an Aspire Award from the Mark Foundation to investigate the potential benefits of blocking the enzyme ADP-ribosyltransferase 1(ART1), which is highly expressed on the cell surface of many non-small lung cancer tumors.

In previous research, Dr. Stiles found that ART1 blunts the body’s immune response against lung cancer. It does so by mono-ADP-ribosylating receptors on T cells and other immune cells, causing those cells to die. In work with mouse models of lung cancer, Dr. Stiles showed that inhibiting ART1 with a monoclonal antibody triggered an increase in immune cells that dramatically stopped the growth of lung cancer tumors. Now, Dr. Stiles will further explore the use of anti-ART1 monoclonal antibodies for treating lung cancer and assess whether the antibodies also help against other types of cancer. Dr. Stiles is assistant professor of cardiothoracic & vascular surgery at Einstein and associate director of surgical oncology at Albert Einstein Cancer Center.

Wednesday, September 01, 2021
 

Rewarding Research Recognition—Susan Band Horwitz, Ph.D., was recently honored by the Hope Funds for Cancer Research, which promotes research efforts in oncology and recognizes scientists, physicians, and philanthropists who have made a significant impact on patient outcomes through the award of an annual medal. The organization presented its medal to Dr. Horwitz for her outstanding contributions in cancer research, identifying the mechanism of action of chemotherapeutic drugs, particularly those derived from natural products, and evaluating drug resistance. Her most renowned work detailed the therapeutic properties of Taxol, which is widely used to treat numerous cancers and has saved millions of lives. Dr. Horwitz is distinguished professor emerita of molecular pharmacology and is the Rose C. Falkenstein Chair in Cancer Research. 

Tuesday, August 24, 2021
 

Elected to Serve—Robert H. Singer, Ph. D., was elected the Section 22 chair of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). In this role, Dr. Singer oversees the election of new members to the NAS within cellular and developmental biology. The NAS is a prestigious nonprofit society of distinguished scholars whose members are elected in recognition of their outstanding achievements conducting original research. Dr. Singer’s election to the NAS in 2013 honored his exceptional accomplishments in cell biology, in particular his work with mRNA molecules and approaches to imaging RNA. He is professor and co-chair of anatomy & structural biology, professor in the Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience and of cell biology,  and co-director of the Gruss-Lipper Biophotonics Center and of the Integrated Imaging Program. He also holds the Harold and Muriel Block Chair in Anatomy & Structural Biology.

Thursday, August 12, 2021
 

Special Recognition—Joanne Siegel, co-director of our Kennedy Center's University Center for Excellence in Developmental, Service, Training and Research, was invited to join Drs. Tim Shriver and Alicia Bazzano at the Special Olympics Inclusive Health Summit in June. Her team's work to carry out the National Curriculum Initiative in Developmental Medicine project was recognized during the event, where she received a certificate of recognition and gave a presentation about our work on the curriculum initiative. Her invitation to the event noted, ”The commitment that Albert Einstein College of Medicine has made to changing medical school curriculum is enormously powerful as an example to other schools.”

Wednesday, July 21, 2021
 

Optical Excellence—The National Eye Institute has awarded Dr. Wei Liu and his team $40,000 for developing two different types of organoids that mimic the human retina in complex features. One of the small retinal structures that Dr. Liu’s group created is rich in cones—visual receptor cells responsible for color vision and visual accuity—and the other contains an optic nerve-like structure. The organoids can serve as models for researchers investigating retinal diseases that threaten or severely impair vision, such as juvenile glaucoma and Leber Congenital Amaurosis. In a video about his research, Dr. Liu explains how to grow the organoids. This is Dr. Liu’s third success in the NEI 3-D Retina Organoid Challenge, making him the only winner who has succeeded three times in a row. Dr. Liu is assistant professor of ophthalmology & visual sciences and of genetics.

Friday, February 26, 2021
 

Dual Honors from NCI—The National Cancer Institute’s Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program has recognized the work of Drs. Howard Strickler and Robert Burk in its Research Highlights for 2020—the first time two articles from the Cancer and Epidemiology, Prevention and Control (CEPaC) program of the Albert Einstein Cancer Center have appeared in the same year. Dr Strickler’s study, Primary HPV and Molecular Cervical Cancer Screening in US Women Living with HIV, originally appeared in Clinical Infectious Diseases. He and his team found that human papillomavirus screening with HPV16/18 genotyping reduced unnecessary colposcopies. Dr. Burk’s paper, Cervicovaginal Microbiome and Natural History of HPV in a Longitudinal Study, was first published in PLoS Pathogens. He and his team demonstrated that features of the cervicovaginal microbiome are associated with human papillomavirus infection progression. Dr. Strickler leads the CEPaC and is professor and division head of epidemiology & population health. Dr. Burk is a member of CEPaC and professor of pediatrics, of microbiology & immunology, of obstetrics & gynecology and women’s health, and of epidemiology & population health. 

Friday, February 26, 2021
 

Young Physician-Scientist Award—The American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI) has awarded a 2020 Young Physician-Scientist Award to Dr. Niraj Shenoy. Toward supporting the scientific efforts, educational needs, and clinical aspirations of physician-scientists to improve health, the ASCI recognizes individuals who are early in their first faculty appointment and have made notable achievements in their research. As a principal investigator, Dr. Shenoy’s research interests range from the most basic—interactions between driver pathways, epigenomics (DNA methylation), metabolism, and immune evasion—to early-phase cancer clinical trials. He has been first or senior author on 26 peer-reviewed articles (several in high-impact journals) and has presented his work at many national and international meetings. His knowledge and skills inform his practice as an attending physician in medical oncology at Montefiore. Dr. Shenoy is assistant professor of medicine at Einstein and clinical oncologist in genitourinary malignancies at Montefiore, with a focus on kidney cancer.

Thursday, January 14, 2021
 

Body Double—When a car ages and starts to break down, to keep it running we often buy replacement parts. Could this be a model for human longevity? Yes, suggests neuroscientist Dr. Jean Hébert in his new e-book, Replacing Aging, published by Science Unbound. Dr. Hébert takes a close look at the lab-grown organs and prosthetics/bionics that could make it happen. The book expands on a blog he wrote for Einstein’s The Doctor’s Tablet. Dr Hébert is professor in the Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience and of genetics

Thursday, December 17, 2020
 

A Big "PLOS" for Journal—John Greally, Ph.D., D.Med., was appointed editor of the epigenetics section of PLOS Genetics. The peer-reviewed, open-access journal publishes studies providing insights into the biological process that governs heredity of traits in humans, as well as in model organisms—from mice and flies, to plants and bacteria. Epigenetics, which examines changes in an individual or organism that do not involve alterations in the DNA sequence, is among the areas of focus covered in the journal. Dr. Greally has previously served on the journal’s editorial board. His lab uses genomic techniques to understand the onset of human disease, specifically focusing on cellular epigenetic models of reprogramming. He is currently writing a textbook, Epigenetics: History, Mechanism and Disease. Dr. Greally is professor of genetics, of medicine and of pediatrics, and director of the Center for Epigenomics, at Einstein. He also is a clinical geneticist at Montefiore.

Monday, October 05, 2020
 
First Page | Previous Page | Page of 28 | Next Page | Last Page