Einstein Experts for Media

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Julio A. Aguirre-Ghiso, Ph.D.

Julio A. Aguirre-Ghiso, Ph.D.

Professor, Cell Biology, Medicine and Oncology

Founding director, Cancer Dormancy and Tumor Microenvironment Institute

Co-Director, Gruss-Lipper Biophotonics Center

Co-Leader, Albert Einstein Cancer Center Tumor Microenvironment and Metastasis Program

Cancer biologyCancer dormancy and the tumor microenvironmentCancer metastasisStress signaling

Julio Aguirre-Ghiso, Ph.D., is an international leader in cancer cell dormancy and metastasis. He has helped lead a major shift in the cancer biology field by investigating how cancer cells hibernate, undetected, for long periods of time and what causes them to suddenly awaken to seed deadly, treatment-resistant metastases. read more...

 

Steven C. Almo, Ph.D.

Steven C. Almo, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair, Biochemistry

Wollowick Family Foundation Chair in Multiple Sclerosis and Immunology

Director, Macromolecular Therapeutics Developmental Facility

BiochemistryDrug discoveryImmunotherapy and cancer

X-ray crystallography

Dr. Steven Almo is an internationally recognized leader in the field of structural biology. His lab uses high-resolution X-ray crystallography to determine the shapes and structures of proteins to better understand their function and help develop new drugs. The goal is to make immunotherapy treatments that more precisely and effectively treat a variety of cancers while causing far fewer side effects than current therapies.  read more...

 

Aviv Bergman, Ph.D.

Aviv Bergman, Ph.D.

Professor and Founding Chair, Systems & Computational Biology

Professor, Pathology

Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience

Harold and Muriel Block Chair in Systems & Computational Biology

Evolutionary biologySystems biologyBiological modeling

 Dr. Bergman combines data from basic and clinical research to create computer models of complex biological systems. As these models evolve, his work could contribute to calculating individualized medical outcomes and guiding treatment for patients based on their personal genetic make-up. Dr. Bergman has teamed with colleagues to study a variety of complex conditions, including aging, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. read more...

 

Craig A. Branch, Ph.D.

Craig A. Branch, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Radiology

Director, Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center

Co-Director, EGL Integrated Imaging Program

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)Sickle cell disease Traumatic Brain Injury and Concussion MRI measures of function and physiology

Dr. Craig Branch is an internationally-known MRI researcher who has been a pioneer in using the technology since it was first developed in the early 1980s. Dr. Branch directs Einstein’s Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center, which supports a wide variety of MRI studies of brain injury and disease, liver disease, cancer, and other disorders. 

Dr. Branch specializes in the use of MRI to study disease in both humans and animal models. He was one of the first to use MRI to measure blood flow in the brain, and he employs the technology to assess brain function and structure in numerous disorders, including sickle cell disease, stroke, traumatic brain injury and schizophrenia. He is one of the only researchers to have used animal models of sickle cell disease (SCD) to research the biological mechanisms that underlie cognitive impairment and strokes in SCD. Research findings in this area suggest that brain blood flow associated with SCD strokes is unusually high—a finding that could lead to treatments that might ward off strokes in SCD patients.  

Dr. Branch is also Co-Director of the Evelyn-Gruss-Lipper Integrated Imaging Program (EGL-IIP) which seeks to use microscopic-to-macroscopic imaging scales to understand the mechanisms that contribute to breast and other metastatic cancers.  Research in this area incorporates both rodent models of cancer and clinical studies of human breast cancer. In addition to his NIH-funded research, Dr. Branch has served as an MRI expert on several NIH ad-hoc review committees.
 

Robert D. Burk, M.D.

Robert D. Burk, M.D.

Professor and Vice Chair for Translational Research, Department of Pediatrics

Professor, Microbiology & Immunology

Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology and Women’s Health

Professor, Epidemiology and Population Health

Attending Physician, Pediatrics, the Children's Hospital at Montefiore

Human papillomavirus (HPV)Cervical cancer screeningMolecular evolution

Dr. Burk is an authority on the genomics and evolution of human papillomaviruses (HPV), which cause nearly all cases of cervical cancer. His team was the first to report, in the New England Journal of Medicine, that the vast majority of HPV infections in young women are short-lived and don’t require treatment. More recently, his lab is utilizing Next-Gen sequencing to study papillomavirus genomics and methylation of the viral genome. His lab utilized this new technology to identify HPV16 and beta- and gamma-HPVs associated with head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCCs).

Dr. Burk is also currently investigating the role of the human microbiome and cervical HPV natural history. He is a co-PI on a grant with Drs. Kaplan and Rob Knight (UCSD) studying the human gut microbiome and obesity and diabetes in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Dr. Burk’s lab has pioneered translational studies of the human microbiome by developing home collection kits that have been used to collect over 5,000 samples.

Dr. Burk was elected in 2015 as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).
 

John S. Condeelis, Ph.D.

John S. Condeelis, Ph.D.

Professor and Co-Chair, Anatomy and Structural Biology

Judith and Burton P. Resnick Chair in Translational Research

Co-Director, Gruss Lipper Biophotonics Center

Scientific Director, Analytical Imaging Facility

Biomedical technologiesIntravital imagingTumor microenvironmentBreast cancerMetastasis

Dr. Condeelis is a pioneer in developing microscope techniques for use in “intravital imaging” – observing the behavior of cells in living animals. His work has led to a clinical test of biopsy tissue to determine whether a woman’s breast cancer will spread (metastasize), which could help determine treatment. Because of the test’s success, Dr. Condeelis and colleagues have licensed the patent rights to a biotech firm, which is developing the tissue test into a commercial product. read more...

 

Ana Maria Cuervo, Ph.D., M.D.

Ana Maria Cuervo, Ph.D., M.D.

Professor, Developmental and Molecular Biology

Professor, Anatomy and Structural Biology

Co-Director, Institute for Aging Research

Robert and Renée Belfer Chair for the Study of Neurodegenerative Diseases

Molecular BiologyAgingAutophagy

Cellular biology

Dr. Cuervo is considered a leader in the field of autophagy— the process by which cells remove and recycle their waste. The Barcelona, Spain native is also an expert on the cellular biology of aging. Dr. Cuervo has been quoted in numerous publications, including The New York Times, Nature, Science, Scientific American, and The Scientistread more...

 

Harris Goldstein, M.D.

Harris Goldstein, M.D.

Professor, Department of Pediatrics (Pediatric Allergy & Immunology)

Professor, Department of Microbiology & Immunology

Associate Dean for Scientific Resources

Charles Michael Chair in Autoimmune Diseases

Director, Einstein-Rockefeller-CUNY Center for AIDS Research

HIV pathogenesis and HIV cure The immune system's antiviral activityEngineering molecules to attack virusesCAR-T cell structure and function Biologics against cancer and viruses

Dr. Goldstein’s NIH-funded research centers on developing agents to amplify the capacity of the immune system to control HIV infection and achieve a functional cure for the disease. In seeking to “weaponize” the immune system to cure HIV, his lab uses molecular, cellular, and biochemical approaches, including CAR-T cells and the novel treatment strategy developed by Dr. Almo at Einstein for selective T cell amplification called synTac (synthetic T-cell activation).  read more...

 

John M. Greally, Ph.D., D.Med., M.B.,B.Ch.,B.A.O.

John M. Greally, Ph.D., D.Med., M.B.,B.Ch.,B.A.O.

Director, Center for Epigenomics, Einstein

Faculty Scholar for Epigenomics, Einstein

Attending Physician, Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital at Montefiore

GeneticsEpigenetics/epigenomics

Dr. Greally began his career as a pediatrician who subspecialized in clinical genetics, seeing patients with genetic syndromes, birth defects and developmental problems. Now, Dr. Greally seeks to understand how genetic disease is caused not by DNA mutations, but due to abnormalities in how genes are switched off and on – a field known as epigenomics.  read more...

 

Milan Kinkhabwala, M.D.

Milan Kinkhabwala, M.D.

Professor, Surgery, Einstein

Chief, Transplantation, Montefiore Einstein Center for Transplantation

Director, Abdominal Organ Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care

Liver diseasesTransplantationStem cell research

Liver cancer

Dr. Kinkhabwala is an active member of Einstein’s NIH-funded Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, where he is working to develop new treatments derived from stem cells for liver diseases, including liver cancer. An expert in complex liver surgery, including liver transplantation, he helped establish the Montefiore Einstein Center for Transplantation, where physicians, surgeons, nurses and other clinicians work with scientists to deliver integrated care for patients with organ failure.   read more...

 

Steven A. Porcelli, M.D.

Steven A. Porcelli, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Microbiology & Immunology

Professor, Medicine (Rheumatology)

Murray and Evelyne Weinstock Chair in Microbiology & Immunology

Microbiology & ImmunologyT-cell immunityTuberculosis (TB)

Dr. Porcelli studies the control of acquired immunity – the type that develops when our bodies generate specific responses involving antibodies or T cells following exposure to vaccines or infection by disease-causing microbes.  In particular, he investigates how T cells – which supervise both defense against microbes and immune tolerance – control the acquired immune response. read more...

 

Vern L. Schramm, Ph.D.

Vern L. Schramm, Ph.D.

Professor, Biochemistry

Ruth Merns Chair in Biochemistry

BiochemistryEnzymesTranslational medicine

RicinAutoimmune diseases

Dr. Schramm is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and associate editor of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.  His pioneering work in biochemistry has resulted in powerful new strategies for treating cancer, antibiotic resistance and autoimmune diseases. read more...

 

Jeffrey E. Segall, Ph.D.

Jeffrey E. Segall, Ph.D.

Professor, Anatomy and Structural Biology

Professor, Pathology

Betty and Sheldon Feinberg Senior Faculty Scholar in Cancer Research

Biomedical technologiesImagingTumor cell imaging

Dr. Segall studies how tumor cells invade tissues and spread through the body. He has developed sophisticated imaging methods for following individual tumor cells moving in living animals. For example, one of his techniques involves a tiny glass window implanted in the skin of a mouse that allows scientists to track individual cancer cells as they spread a tumor site and attack other parts of the body. This technique could one day be used for assessing the effectiveness of specific drugs in preventing cancer from metastasizing. read more...

 

Simon D. Spivack, M.D., M.P.H.

Simon D. Spivack, M.D., M.P.H.

Professor, Medicine (Pulmonary Medicine), Einstein

Professor, Epidemiology & Population Health, Einstein

Professor, Genetics, Einstein

Chief, Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Medicine, Einstein and Montefiore Health System

Lung diseasesLung cancerEarly lung cancer detection

A researcher and clinician, Dr. Spivack is developing tests for detecting lung cancer at the earliest possible stage—before it becomes fatal by spreading to other parts of the body. In one of several NIH-funded studies, his laboratory is working on a noninvasive, early-diagnosis test for lung cancer that detects particular genetic elements and chemicals in exhaled breath. read more...

 

Ulrich G. Steidl, Ph.D., M.D.

Ulrich G. Steidl, Ph.D., M.D.

Professor, Cell Biology

Professor, Medicine

Deputy Director, Albert Einstein Cancer Center

Rose C. Falkenstein Chair in Cancer Research

Interim Director, The Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Research

Leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes Pre-cancerous and cancer stem cellsCell and tumor biology

Dr. Steidl studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to two related blood diseases, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). His NIH-funded basic and translational research seeks to define the characteristics of pre-leukemic stem cells (pre-LSC), understand their progression to leukemic stems cells, and develop drug strategies to target the process. Dr. Steidl is co-director of the Albert Einstein Cancer Center's Blood Cancer Institute. read more...

 

Jan Vijg, Ph.D.

Jan Vijg, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair, Genetics

Professor, Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

Lola and Saul Kramer Chair in Molecular Genetics

GeneticsGenomic instabilityAging

Cancer

Dr. Vijg studies the molecular genetic changes associated with aging. Instability of genome and epigenome – the entire set of an organism’s genes and the switches that control their activity –  has long been implicated as the main cause of cancer and of the loss of organ and tissue function associated with aging. read more...

 

Judith Wylie-Rosett, Ed.D.

Judith Wylie-Rosett, Ed.D.

Professor, Epidemiology & Population Health (Health Promotion and Nutrition Research)

Professor, Medicine (Endocrinology)

Division Head, Health Promotion and Nutritional Research, Department of Epidemiology & Population Health

Atran Foundation Chair in Social Medicine

NutritionObesityWeight management

Behavior modificationType 2 diabetes

Dr. Wylie-Rosett’s research focuses on nutrition’s role in preventing and controlling chronic diseases—particularly diseases such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease in which obesity is an important risk factor.  She is associate editor of the journal Diabetes Care and author of The Complete Weight Loss Workbook. Dr. Wylie-Rosett has helped the American Diabetes Association and American Heart Association develop nutrition-related recommendations and position statements. read more...