MS Program Current Courses

Current Courses

Spring Courses 2022:

BIOE 5101 and 5102

Bioethics and Medical Humanities I and II

Instructors: Lauren Flicker, JD; Carolyn Neuhaus, PhD; Danielle Spencer, PhD

Description:
This year-long course can be taken independently to earn a Certificate and/or as required coursework for the Master of Science in Bioethics. Faculty collaborate with students in a combination of two full-day retreats and weekly seminars to offer an intellectually rich year introducing the foundations of bioethics as a field, key principles in moral theory, methods of legal and literary analysis, and the skills necessary to apply the insights of bioethics to daily medical practice and research. We examine core bioethics issues using a multiplicity of perspectives and draw upon the depth of expertise not only of faculty but also of our participants, many of whom bring years of clinical, legal and other professional experience to the program.

Time: Wednesdays 4-7pm (August through April; both semesters required)

Prerequisites: None

Credit 6

Philosophy at the Bedside

Instructors: Paola Nicolas, PhD, MS Bioethics

Description:
What does philosophy bring to clinical practice? This class is an exploration of philosophical themes in Western tradition – identity, memory, death, dignity of risk, etc. – that can shed a new light on the clinical encounter. We will study texts from philosophy, sociology, anthropology and narrative medicine to have a better understanding of the process of hospitalization, from the patient’s arrival at the hospital, to diagnosis and treatment, and ending with the person’s release from the hospital or death.

Time/Place: Tuesdays 4-6, online

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Credit 2

BIOE 5306

Pharmaceutical Ethics

Instructors: Angela Rossetti, MBA, MS Bioethics

Description:
Drug therapy has always been integral to the practice of medicine, from the earliest use of botanicals to contemporary biopharmaceuticals. In the last 125 years, drug therapy has evolved to a more than trillion-dollar industry and now occupies a uniquely important role in global public health. Because of its size and importance to human health and well-being, the industry carries a significant ethical responsibility.

Most recently, the Covid pandemic and its consequences highlighted the dependence of the world on a global, well-functioning biopharmaceutical industry. The work of drug discovery, development and accessible distribution is expensive. No government has demonstrated the willingness, scientific or financial ability to undertake the that work alone, and governments rely largely upon the biopharmaceutical industry for many aspects of drug availability.

This class will examine the history and origins of the commercial biopharmaceutical industry, its continuous evolution and regulation, the drivers of its growth, its missteps, its successes, and its ethics that all combined, have changed the course of human disease.

Time/Place: Thursdays 4-6, online

Prerequisites: Certificate course or permission of instructor

Credit 2

BIOE 5322

Crazy Ladies and Cuckoos’ Nests: Bias, Image and Mental Illness

Instructor: Tia Powell, MD

Description:
The course will explore images of mental illness from the nineteenth century to the present. We will use materials from the psychiatric literature, news accounts, fiction, biographies, film, and patient narratives. Key themes include: what is mental illness? How have health professionals responded to those with mental illness over time? How do institutions like police and schools impact mental illness? How does stigma related to mental illness overlap with other sources of stigma, including poverty, gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity? What are ongoing ethics challenges in supporting those with mental illness?

Time/Place: Mondays 4-6, online

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit 2


Winter Semester

BIOE 5200

Bioethics Mediation (Intensive)

Instructors:

Description:
This four-five day course in January is an intensive seminar taught by national leaders in bioethics mediation. Mediation is a vital tool for managing and resolving conflicts between and among healthcare staff and families. Mediation helps all parties to articulate their values and acknowledges the perspectives of all participants. The course covers essential techniques through role-plays, brief lectures, exercises, and intensive individual feedback.

Time: Mon-Friday, full day classes, each January.

Prerequisites: permission of instructor

Credit 2


Summer Semester 2022

BIOE 5305

Human Subjects Research

Instructors: Elizabeth Chuang, with Center for Bioethics Faculty

Description:
The seminar is open to all Masters in Bioethics students and students enrolled in the Einstein Clinical Research Training Program. Topics include: informed consent for research, risk-benefit analysis, biobanking, undue inducements, therapeutic misconception, deception and debriefing, research integrity, multinational research, public health research, and research protections for vulnerable populations. Additional emerging topics may include: return of unanticipated research results; regulatory issues in quality improvement activities/learning healthcare systems; newer research designs such as comparative effectiveness and adaptive trials; use of genetic data; waivers for consent; and the use of the electronic medical record and big data in research.

Time/Place: Class will meet online or at Einstein – (check with Professor Chuang for current logistics), twice weekly for 4 weeks in the summer.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit 2

BIOE 5201

Bioethics Consultation Skills

Instructors: Flicker, Hulkower, Powell, Lipman, Herron

Description:
This 4 day intensive course typically meets in June. Drawing upon the decades of experience of Montefiore’s Bioethics Consultation service, the faculty of the Montefiore-Einstein Center for Bioethics will cover selected topics from the ASBH's Core Competencies. The course will help students develop communication skills, master the process of bioethics consultation and gain practical experience in approaching ethical dilemmas in clinical medicine. This course is designed for those seeking clinical training in bioethics consultation. It may be taken on its own or as part of the Masters’ Program.

Time/Place: One week each June, online

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit 2

BIOE 5203

Jewish Medical Ethics

Instructor: Edward Reichman, MD

Description:
Judaism is one of the world’s oldest religions with a rich heritage and an expansive legal literary tradition dating back to the times of the Bible and Talmud. Judaism has a unique approach to medical ethical dilemmas that can contribute to modern ethical discourse. This course will provide students with a basic introduction to the principles of Jewish law as they relate to medical ethics. These principles will then be applied to issues in contemporary medical ethics ranging from beginning of life to end of life. Topics analyzed will include abortion, contraception, infertility, genetics, cloning, organ transplantation, the definition of death, autopsy and stem cell research. In addition, new frontiers in science and medicine will be explored through the lens of Jewish law. The contribution of principles of Jewish medical ethics to the broader dialogue of modern bioethics will be discussed. Readings will be drawn from ancient rabbinic texts, as well as modern authors on Jewish bioethics. Emphasis will be placed on textual analysis of primary and secondary sources (in English translation) culled from over two thousand years of rabbinic literature. This intensive course typically meets on 4 consecutive Wednesdays during the summer.

Time/Place: Wednesdays, full days, summer, usually July

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Credit 2

BIOE 5400

Capstone/Thesis Project

Instructors: Appropriate to the student’s project

Description:
This course is a fundamental requirement for the masters’ degree. Students submit a proposal, then work toward research, writing and revision for an extended project, under the guidance of an advisor in the relevant field, selected from the faculty of Cardozo, Einstein or rarely and with permission, external faculty. A student may register for all 4 credits in one semester, or for 2 credits each in two consecutive semesters.

Credit 4, divided over 2 semesters or all in one semester

BIOE 5903

Bioethics Independent Course

Instructors: TBD

Description:
This course provides an opportunity for MS Bioethics students to design and participate in a semester-long, seminar-style independent study, under the supervision of a faculty advisor, with significant reading and writing assignments. As with all independent studies, the student needs to choose a faculty member to help devise the project and then have the proposal approved by the Center.

Credit 1-2


Previous/Future Courses

Bioethics for Pandemics

Instructor: Tia Powell, MD

Description:
The course will address a broad range of ethics issues within both the current pandemic and those from the past and potentially ahead in the future. We will examine classic bioethics literature setting out the tensions between obligations to individual patients and to the health of populations. We will review guidance documents prepared by various national and international groups, looking at overarching similarities and differences. We will address the way in which public health disasters affect various vulnerable groups, including minorities, elders, and prisoners. We will investigate the ethical responsibilities of government, individuals and institutions in pandemic response. Readings offer a broad range of perspectives, including classical accounts of plague, current medical, legal and public health publications.

Time/Place: Mondays 4-6, online

BIOE 5328

Feminism Gender Studies

Instructor: Paola Nicolas, PhD, MS Bioethics

Description:
In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on the prevalence of implicit bias in health care delivery in the United States. This course explore how gender studies can help to identify institutionalized sex and gender-based violence and to improve medical care for women and LGBTQ communities. We will read major figures in the field (Beauvoir, Lorde, bell hooks, Vivek Shraya, etc) in dialogue with the most recent medical publications where sex & gender disparities of treatment are documented (pain-management, CVD, etc.) Among others, topics such as intersectionality, women of other cultures, domestic violence and rape will be addressed. We will discuss how to integrate those issues in medical education and medical training.

Credit 2

The Legislature in the Clinic

Instructor: Lauren Flicker

Description:
This course can be taken independently, or as a follow-up to Bioethics in the Court. In this seminar, students will study legislation that dictates the behavior or speech of clinicians. Students will learn how to read statutes, and be asked to consider when it is appropriate for the legislature to interfere in the clinic, and what to recommend as an ethicists when the legally required action is not consistent with the ethical action.

Class Time: Tuesdays 4-6pm

Credit 2

BIOE 5315

Reproductive Ethics and the Law

Instructor: Flicker

Description:
This course will explore legal and ethical issues raised by reproduction and the use of assisted reproductive technologies. We will study legal theory and practice involving contraception, assisted reproduction, abortion, sterilization, and personhood. We will approach these topics using a wide range of sources, including legal cases, historical scholarship, and bioethics literature. Grades will be determined by class participation and a final paper.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit 2

BIOE 5318

Dementia, Ethics and Health Policy

Instructor: Tia Powell, MD

Description:
The course explores a range of ethical issues arising from dementia, including diagnosis, treatment, research, and health policies. The course begins by studying definitions of different types of dementia and related states, such as minimal cognitive impairment and cognitive aging. Topics include: neuropathology of dementia, as well as current trends – and failures -- in research for dementia treatments; factors that increase and decrease the probability of developing dementia, including social determinants of health; caregiver burdens and stressors; abuse, neglect and financial scams affecting those with cognitive impairment; safe driving and public health concerns; use of technology to support independent living; nursing home quality and functions; and end of life care for severe dementia. For each topic, the class will identify and analyze related ethical challenges related to dementia.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit 2

BIOE 5324

Bioethics in the Court

Instructor: Flicker

Description:
This course will explore the ethical implications of court cases that impact patient care. We will approach topics including reproductive rights, death and dying, vaccination, and access to healthcare. We will approach these topics using amicus briefs and court cases. Grades will be determined by class participation, short writing assignments, and a final exam.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit 2