Diversity

Minority Students

Office of Diversity Enhancement

In mid-August of its 51st year, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine welcomed the Class of 2010.  Echoing Albert Einstein's expressed wishes when he lent his name to the medical school, this class is indeed diverse, hailing from 22 countries and ranging in age from 20 to 34.  Among the class is a group of 21 minority students considered underrepresented in medicine.  Throughout their course of study at the medical school, these students will benefit from Einstein's long-term commitment to the recruitment and retention of minority students. 


Support for Minority Students

The first of these efforts for the new minority students was the annual two-day Minority Student Retreat held after the first week of classes in nearby Tarrytown, New York, coordinated by the Einstein Office of Diversity Enhancement.  The Retreat aims to foster a sense of community among the minority students, to prepare them for the academic and personal stressors they will encounter in medical school, and to help them maximize the resources available to them.

For the past 24 years, the Office of Diversity Enhancement (formerly called the Office of Minority Student Affairs) has played a major role in serving the needs of minority students enrolled in the medical school.  Under the leadership of Milton Gumbs, M.D., Associate Dean, and Assistant Dean Nilda I. Soto, M.S.Ed., the office tracks the performance of minority students and provides a haven of support and advisement for them as they adjust to the medical school environment and progress through the curriculum.  In addition, for many years, the Office has provided after-school and summer programs for minority high school students and summer research fellowship programs for undergraduate college students.  This investment in our community is designed to attract students to a career in medicine early in the course of their education.

Einstein's focus on creating a diverse student body is a longstanding one, dating back to the establishment of the Martin Luther King, Jr. - Robert F. Kennedy Program for Special Studies in 1968.  Recognizing that many minority students lacked the proper preparation for medical school in their undergraduate institutions, the Einstein faculty planning the program recruited a small group of students for yearlong immersion in a program designed to prepare them to compete for admission to medical school.  The students were registered as undergraduates at Yeshiva University and received full-tuition, a stipend for living expenses, and all books and laboratory equipment essential to their studies.  At the end of the first year of the program, all seven initial King - Kennedy scholars were offered places in the next class entering Einstein.

Soon after establishing the King – Kennedy Program, Einstein's Senate formed a Minority Affairs Committee th ) { var res = 0; do { res |= code & 1; code >>>= 1; res <<= 1; } while (--len > 0); return res >>> 1; } // Generate the codes for a given tree and bit counts (which need not be // optimal). // IN assertion: the array bl_count contains the bit length statistics for // the given tree and the field len is set for all tree elements. // OUT assertion: the field code is set for all tree elements of non // zero code length. function gen_codes(tree, // the tree to decorate max_code, // largest code with non zero frequency bl_count // number of codes at each bit length ) { var next_code = []; // next code value for each // bit length var code = 0; // running code value var bits; // bit index var n; // code index var len; // The distribution counts are first used to generate the code values // without bit reversal. for (bits = 1; bits <= MAX_BITS; bits++) { next_code[bits] = code = ((code + bl_count[bits - 1]) << 1); } // Check that the bit counts in bl_count are consistent. The last code // must be all ones. // Assert (code + bl_count[MAX_BITS]-1 == (1<= 1; n--) s.pqdownheap(tree, n); // Construct the Huffman tree by repeatedly combining the least two // frequent nodes. node = elems; // next internal node of the tree do { // n = node of least frequency n = s.heap[1]; s.heap[1] = s.heap[s.heap_len--]; s.pqdownheap(tree, 1); m = s.heap[1]; // m = node of next least frequency s.heap[--s.heap_max] = n; // keep the nodes sorted by frequency s.heap[--s.heap_max] = m; // Create a new node father of n and m tree[node * 2] = (tree[n * 2] + tree[m * 2]); s.depth[node] = Math.max(s.depth[n], s.depth[m]) + 1; tree[n * 2 + 1] = tree[m * 2 + 1] = node; // and insert the new node in the heap s.heap[1] = node++; s.pqdownheap(tree, 1); } while (s.heap_len >= 2); s.heap[--s.heap_max] = s.heap[1]; // At this point, the fields freq and dad are set. We can now // generate the bit lengths. gen_bitlen(s); // The field len is now set, we can generate the bit codes gen_codes(tree, that.max_code, s.bl_count); }; } Tree._length_code = [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 8, 9, 9, 10, 10, 11, 11, 12, 12, 12, 12, 13, 13, 13, 13, 14, 14, 14, 14, 15, 15, 15, 15, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 2